China News

BBC | Oct 07, 2011

Two Tibetan teenagers set themselves on fire in China's Sichuan province, the latest in a series of similar protests against Chinese rule, rights groups say.

New York Times | Oct 07, 2011

With relations frayed with Washington, Pakistan has been trying to shore up its ties with China, which, though a benefactor, has its own set of concerns.

New York Times | Oct 07, 2011

With relations frayed with Washington, Pakistan has been trying to shore up its ties with China, which, though a benefactor, has its own set of concerns.

BBC | Oct 07, 2011

The US senate postpones its vote on a much-debated currency bill, which would impose penalties on China for under-valuing its currency.

Guardian | Oct 06, 2011

Until recently, Huaxi was a poor farming community, typical of eastern China. Now, thanks to the ambition of one man, it is a powerhouse symbol of the country's economic expansion, embodied by a giant 328m-tall towerAn incongruous new sight has risen up in the countryside of eastern China: a skyscraper taller than any building in London or Tokyo, topped by what looks very much like a giant, golden disco ball.

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

Will you choose Manchu too?

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

A super centenary Sun suit

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

COUNTRIES choose their friends but not their neighbours. Mongolia has just two, China and Russia. Both are huge; and both, at different periods in history, used to dominate it. Two decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Mongolia—once called the 16th Soviet republic—is enjoying the exercise of full sovereignty. And it is expecting a giddy few decades of spectacular growth fuelled by the exploitation of its mineral riches. Yet its biggest market is China, which would happily gobble up as much copper, coal, gold and other minerals as Mongolia can produce. And its only alternative...

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

THESE days, very few countries dare to offend China, however rich and powerful they may be. Yet that is exactly what one of the world’s poorest countries did on September 30th. The government of Myanmar said it was suspending the construction of an enormous $3.6 billion Chinese-backed dam on the River Irrawaddy in the north of the country.It was an audacious decision. China is Myanmar’s closest strategic ally, nearest neighbour and biggest investor. Yet the Chinese, who had expected to receive almost all the hydroelectric power generated by the Myitsone dam, were not told in advance....

BBC | Oct 06, 2011

Across the globe the tributes have poured in for Apple co-founder Steve Job. A huge reaction to this news also on the web - in China alone more than 50 million messages have been posted on the Chinese equivalents of Twitter.

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

Will you choose Manchu too?

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

A super centenary Sun suit

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

COUNTRIES choose their friends but not their neighbours. Mongolia has just two, China and Russia. Both are huge; and both, at different periods in history, used to dominate it. Two decades after the collapse of the Soviet Union, Mongolia—once called the 16th Soviet republic—is enjoying the exercise of full sovereignty. And it is expecting a giddy few decades of spectacular growth fuelled by the exploitation of its mineral riches. Yet its biggest market is China, which would happily gobble up as much copper, coal, gold and other minerals as Mongolia can produce. And its only alternative...

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

THESE days, very few countries dare to offend China, however rich and powerful they may be. Yet that is exactly what one of the world’s poorest countries did on September 30th. The government of Myanmar said it was suspending the construction of an enormous $3.6 billion Chinese-backed dam on the River Irrawaddy in the north of the country.It was an audacious decision. China is Myanmar’s closest strategic ally, nearest neighbour and biggest investor. Yet the Chinese, who had expected to receive almost all the hydroelectric power generated by the Myitsone dam, were not told in advance....

The Economist | Oct 06, 2011

ON MOST days for the past several years, pilots from the Japan Air Self-Defence Force have scrambled to stop military aircraft from China and Russia buzzing Japan’s air space. It is a reminder of how prickly Japan’s ties with its neighbours have become, not least because of contested sovereignty over a few remote islands. Intercepts of Chinese planes almost tripled last year, to 96 (see chart). Russia, meanwhile, recently sent two bombers skirting provocatively around the Japanese archipelago.Amid such taunts, on September 26th Japan received three bids to supply an order of more than 40...

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